Bhutan

7 must do things in Bhutan


archery is national movement of bhutan and its passion.On hills, fields and stadiums across the country, you’ll find hordes of men wearing their patterns ghost (traditional robes) Take turns shooting arrows at a small target 140 meters away.

All around them, residents of neighboring villages booed, and cheerleaders—groups of women in their finest silk costumes singing and dancing in circles—offered words of encouragement to their teams and jeered at the opposition. The cheers, singing and dancing of the female audience on the sidelines were as exciting as the competition.

in every village Bhutan There is an archery range and the Changlimithang Stadium in Thimphu is the Kingdom’s premier archery range.

The Coronation National Archery Championships and the Yangphel Championships are the biggest events on the Bhutanese archery calendar and are held during the Bhutanese New Year Losar.

Clinging to a steep cliff 900 meters above the Paro Valley, Taktsang Lhakhang (Tiger Cave Temple) belongs to Bhutan Machu Picchuit is taj mahal – Launched a cliffhanger of 1,000 postcards. It’s in every brochure, book and website about the country, but with Bhutan’s restrictions on tourist numbers, it doesn’t feel overrun.

Of course, it could also be due to the lung work involved in climbing the steep, rocky trail to reach it. Just 10 kilometers north of Paro, this vertiginous cliff is the chosen meditation site of Guru Rinpoche, who is said to have arrived here on a flying tiger.

The temple has been rebuilt twice after devastating fires in 1950 and 1998, and you have no choice but to reach it on foot. But the views across the valley to the temple, and the meditative tranquility of the interior, ensure that a visit to Tiger’s Den is a highlight of your visit to Bhutan.

As a Himalayan kingdom isolated for centuries, Bhutan has its fair share of myths and legends.

most famously the Yeti, or move For the locals, although Reinhold Messner Claiming that what people were really seeing was a Himalayan bear, the creature has a strong influence on local culture.Every villager has a story of getting up close and personal with the big furry man move and advice on how to escape.

In fact, Bhutan has a national park dedicated to the Yeti, a 740-square-mile remote wilderness in the eastern part of the country called the Sakteng Wildlife Sanctuary. Your chances of seeing a Yeti are still slim, but the park is also home to other endangered species, including red pandas, snow leopard and tigers, so there’s no shortage of other elusive creatures for you to track down.

Ask any Bhutanese local what their most important thing of the year is and they will tell you Check: A large social gathering held on the tenth day of any given Tibetan lunar month, depending on the region.

It was a time of brisk trading, ceremonial dancing and a chance to meet friends from far-flung villages. I stop TshechuHeld every spring in Paro Dzongkhag, it is considered the most spectacular and colorful.

any bright spot pick bamboo It’s the Cham dance, where monks don macabre masks and elaborate costumes and perform energetic routines to blaring traditional music. Each dance has a moral message, especially in expressing compassion for sentient beings, and is considered a form of meditation, albeit a lively one.

the unfolding of a giant thangka or tondraymarks the end of the program and the moment when revelers gather for blessings before heading home again.

The small village of Sopsokha in Bhutan’s Punahka region is not for the faint of heart. Almost every building is adorned with a giant phallus.

Some are plain. Others are decorated with ribbons. But since the village is on the way to Chimi Lhakhang, a monastery dedicated to Drukpa Kunley, Bhutan’s favorite saint, monk and poet, who also called his penises “divine thunderbolts” – they’re everywhere.

The obsession with the penis seems odd in such a pious and moral country, especially when you consider that in Bhutan it is the villages where women inherit property and men move to their wives.

But the bohemian monk who teaches his lessons by farting and subdues a banshee by turning his penis into a thunderbolt has a lot of appeal to the Bhutanese. At the very least, it will provide engaging content for your Instagram feed.

Snuggle up on the world’s tallest mountain, away from the hordes of tourists nepalBhutan is the gold standard for trekking Himalayas.

From gentle treks through ancient rhododendron forests to challenging 25-day treks across half the country, Bhutan has something for you Hikers of all levels.

this Jhomolhari trek A favorite in Bhutan, follow the ancient trade route through Jigme Dorje National Park to the stunning views of the sacred 7,314m Jhomolhari Peak on the Tibetan border.this Bumthang Cultural Tour Avoid the high peaks in favor of a string of picturesque temples, monasteries and traditional villages.bird watchers will love it aisle pull Focus on spotting black-necked cranes.

If time and money were no object, you’d want to tackle the notorious snowman trek. This is a small expedition through the remote Lunana region and is considered one of the toughest (and most expensive) hikes in the world. It will see you scale peaks as high as 5,320 meters.

Bhutan is known for focusing on better quality of life rather than better trade figures.King Jigme Singye Wangchuck called it Gross National Happiness Back to 1972.

It is also a philosophy that the country’s leaders try to uphold as they try to steer Bhutan into the future without sacrificing what makes Bhutan so special.

For visitors, it’s a chance to think a different way of life and society, the happiness and well-being of all people is the ultimate goal of governance. It’s a philosophy that manifests itself in different ways.and Himalayas In other countries, most of the forests have been cleared, but 75% of the trees are still here.

The result is a strangely familiar yet distinctly different world. And it’s sure to make you ask yourself how you can increase your GNH.



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